Danone Turns to Blockchain for Baby Formula Transparency

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Danone Turns to Blockchain for Baby Formula Transparency

By Lisa Johnston - 02/26/2020
Food and beverage manufacturer Danone is using blockchain to provide greater transparency and traceability into its baby formula supply chain.

Food and beverage manufacturer Danone is using blockchain to provide greater transparency and traceability into its baby formula supply chain.

The service, known as Track & Connect, will also eventually provide data-driven, personalized after-sales support and services for the company’s Aptamil, Karicare, Laboratoire Gallia and Nutrilon brands via QR codes on the packaging.

Products feature one QR code laser-printed on the outer pack and a second behind a tamper-resistant seal. Scanning the outer code displays a brand page with verified info about where and when the formula was manufactured, as well as details about its navigation through the supply chain.

The inner QR code, which can only be scanned after the product has been purchased and opened, triggers when scanned a one-time, initial message that verifies the product’s authenticity.

Danone said it ultimately wants to leverage the packaging to introduce customized after-sale support and services like health and nutrition apps and information; direct toward how-to parenting videos; and provide access to customer helplines or online e-commerce services.

Track & Connect leverages blockchain, serialization and aggregation technology, and Danone also plans to use it to more easily forecast consumer demand and consumer preferences. It will initially launch in China for the Aptamil and Nutrilon brands, and will debut this year in France for its Laboratoire Gallia brand, and in Germany, Australia and New Zealand for Aptamil and Karicare.

As consumer demand for transparency into where their food comes from increases, more companies and retailers are turning to blockchain as a way to provide traceability. Nestle last year announced it would use blockchain to trace milk back to its origins.  Bumble Bee, meanwhile, turned to an SAP blockchain service to trace its yellowfin tuna.